Natural attractions

The Krakov Forest

Krakovski gozd
Krakovski gozd

The Krakov Forest is one of the few preserved forests of its kind in Europe. It is the largest lowland floodplain oak forest in Slovenia, occupying on an area of some 3,000 hectares between the Krka and Sava rivers. In the heart of the forest, there is a preserved 40.5 ha large secondary primeval forest with several-century-old oak trees which has been protected as a nature reserve since 1952. The wetland forest amidst a levelled agricultural land is a sanctuary for many plant and animal species. With 14 species present, amphibians are by far the most endangered, for example the moor frog, and birds such as the middle spotted woodpecker, the collared flycatcher, the black stork, the lesser spotted eagle and the white-tailed eagle. By the forest is an 8-kilometre hiking trail named after Ressel, the inventor the ship propeller.

The Bohor Mountains

Ravni Log, Bohor
Ravni Log, Bohor

This wide, 20-km long mountain range is situated left of Krško; it sits at an altitude of 900 metres and stretches in the east-west direction. The highest village on Bohor is Stranje at 820 metres, and the highest peak of the Bohor mountains is Veliki Javornik at 1024 metres. The mighty forests have always provided refuge to many people, animals and plants. The yew tree that can be found here is protected among tree species in Slovenia. This is also the place where the only preserved habitat of the winter aconite and several Posavje endemic plants are found. The many species of ferns and moss, the protected butcher’s broom and rare orchids give the landscape a special charm. The fauna is varied and includes the chamois, and even the European crayfish in some streams. The Bohor area is intertwined with streams and their waterfalls; natural attractions include the stone needle (Igla) and the Bohor natural window.
There are various hiking trails leading to Bohor past four waterfalls, a partisan hospital and an old mill. Hikers can relax in the mountain chalet (Koča na Bohorju) on the top of Bohor.

The waterfalls of Bohor

Slapovi na Bohorju, Slap Bojanca, foto Jošt Gantar, vir STO
Slapovi na Bohorju, Slap Bojanca, foto Jošt Gantar, vir STO

Rising above Senovo, the area of the Bohor mountains reveals a stunning masterpiece of nature where every outdoor lover can admire four majestic waterfalls: Bojanca, Pekel, Ubojavnik and Bojavnik. Some of the waterfalls are even more than 15 metres high. They are not known well among the public, which contributes to their peaceful environment. The waterfalls are hidden deep in the gorges of streams and therefore do not receive hordes of tourists. Nevertheless, they can be accessed by anyone who is in good enough physical shape to reach them via the trail of the four waterfalls, which makes a good day trip.

For your safety,  local guide is recommended. We advise you to take the trip in nice weather and when it is not too wet, as the trail could otherwise be much more difficult.

The Gorjanci Hills

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Gorjanci

The Karst landscape and predominantly forestcovered mountain range rises up to the popular hiking attraction, Trdinov Vrh (1178 m) above the Krško basin, and occupies the entire southern border of the Municipality of Krško with Croatia. There are many springs in the Gorjanci, the most famous of which are the mythological “Gospodična” and “Minutnik”. Clear streams such as Kobila, Pendirjevka and Kamfer have carved deep and picturesque valleys into the northern slopes. This is where the brown bear lives. The area is also known for the several-century-long tradition of dormouse hunting. The lower slopes and regions without forest are the real home of the Cviček wine. The area of Gorjanci is intertwined with roads, footpaths and marked hiking trails. Forests include the Ravna Gora reserve with several hectares of protected thick beech trees.

The River Sava

Sava
Sava

With more than 200 kilometres in length, the Sava River is not only the longest waterstream in the municipality, but also in Slovenia. Throughout history its changing river flow formed river terraces. Until the second half of the 19th century, it was an important cargo road with ports at Drnovo, Krško and Rajhenburg. In the area of the Municipality of Krško, the river first flows through a narrow gorge, and from the city onwards on Krško’s gravel plain . Over the centuries, the river has trailed through our fields, changing its riverbed occasionally, until we curtailed it with dykes and regulations. It is popular among fishermen for is abundance of fish. The river is also important because of a chain of hydroelectric power plants. Moreover, it is perfect for many water sports such as canoeing, kayaking, and rafting.

The River Krka

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Reka Krka

The Krka River is a typical slow Karst river. With a length of 94 kilometres, it is one of the longest rivers flowing in its entirety in Slovenia. Its source is near the village of Krka, not far from Ivančna Gorica, and flows into the river Sava at Čatež near Brežice. The upper stream of the river is very dynamic due to the elevation drop, while it becomes almost completely still in the lower stream. This green river, also called the green beauty, is very eye-catching and offers much pleasure – boating, SUPing, canoeing, swimming, fishing or simply taking a break from daily worries while lying on its riverbeds. The most picturesque place along the river is Kostanjevica na Krki, which is located on its lower stream and is the only Slovenian town entirely surrounded with water, called also “the Venice of Dolenjska”.

The Mačkovci Ponds

Ribniki Mačkovci
Ribniki Mačkovci

Approximately 2 km to the northeast of Brestanica are the Mačkovci ponds, which were first completed by the Counts of Brestanica and later maintained by the Trappists. The ponds include three artificial ponds occupying a surface area of more than 15 ha, 6.5 ha of which is water surface. The ponds are owned by the Brestanica-Krško fishing club and are extremely popular among fishermen as well as other visitors. You can enjoy great food served in the guest house by the ponds. The nearby forests and meadows are perfect for hiking. Over the years, this has become a popular sports and fishing venue and an excursion site. Visitors can see many animal species, such as turtles, grey herons, grebes and rare frog species. Fish species in the ponds include carp, catfish, grass carp and common rud.

The Ajdovska Cave

Ajdovska jama, Netopirji
Ajdovska jama, Netopirji

Located in a Karst area of the Krško hills, the Ajdovska Cave is an old Neolithic sanctuary which was used as refuge for people from various dangers in Antiquity and the High Middle Ages. It is one of Slovenia’s most important archaeological sites. Being home to the largest birthing colony of the Mediterranean horseshoe bat, which is a particularly endangered species in Europe, the Ajdovska Cave is a natural asset of national importance, and it is also included in the Natura 2000 network. In order to protect the bats, the cave is closed for visitors in the summertime. It is an important Karst habitat and an exemplary case of intertwining the natural and cultural heritage.

Contact:
Zavod Svibna
T: ++386 31 329 625
E: info@zavod-svibna.si
W: www.zavod-svibna.si
GPS: 45.946282, 15.425904

The Senovo Coal Mine

Rudnik Senovo, Premogovniški rov
Rudnik Senovo, Premogovniški rov

Senovo is situated in the northern part of the Municipality of Krško, below the southern slopes of Bohor. The development of Senovo and the entire Senovo- Brestanica valley was closely connected with the coal mine. The history of the Senovo coal mine dates back to 1796, when the farrier Andrej Grabner found coal while preparing charcoal in the Reštanj woods. Count Attems from Rajhenburg first started to exploit coal with surface mining in 1810. After 1904, when TPD took it over, the coal mine started to develop very fast. The population of the valley increased, and it became a typical mining settlement. The majority of the other industry in the valley developed due to the coal mine. In the golden times, the coal mine employed almost 1,000 workers. It is no longer in operation, but it is still open for groups of visitors upon prior arrangement.

The red beech tree

Rdeča bukev
Rdeča bukev

From the Hočevar Square towards the Pod Goro Street there are a few apartment buildings among the former gardens of wealthy citizens. Behind them is a small park where a mighty red beech tree grows. In addition to its beauty, the tree is the largest red beech tree in Slovenia. A well sits distinctively in front of the park beside it a famous 17th century parson’s house.